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Window of the Month
St. Paul's Catholic Church, Onaway, Michigan: artists Peter and Christel Brahm

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Window

Building Name: Cathedral Abbey of St. Anthony, formerly St. Anthony Roman Catholic Church (closed 2006)

Studio Name: Detroit Stained Glass Works, The

City: Detroit

Window Shape: 4 (rounded or rose window)

Date of Window: 1902

Subject/Title of Window: All Seeing Eye of God

Brief Description of Subject: Proverbs 15:3 "The eyes of the Lord are everywhere, keeping watch on the evil and the good."

Not entirely sure that what is pictured here is the "Eye of God", however will defer on this to an article from archival material.

A quote from "Short History of St. Anthony Parish" which was translated from German and appeared in "the Bazaar - a souvenir of 1902" -- "A rich stream of light floods the nave through the rose window over the entrance of the church, center of which is the all-seeing eye of God, not an imported window like the others, but the product of the Detroit firm Friederichs and Wolfrum. The same firm made the windows in the tower...."

The "Eye of God" is usually pictured with an eye inscribed in a triangle (Trinity) with rays (Divine light) radiating from it.

The "eye", the most important part, is not seen here. One has to imagine that it is there behind the clouds (heaven). There are 30 pentagonal shapes that radiate from the clouds. 30 pieces of silver is the price of the betrayal of Christ, ( blood money),  and thus would symbolize His blood.

Height: ~7'

Width: ~7'

All Seeing Eye of God
All Seeing Eye of God
All Seeing Eye of God close-up
All Seeing Eye of God close-up
All Seeing Eye of God outside
All Seeing Eye of God outside

The MSGC is a constantly evolving database. Not all the data that has been collected by volunteers has been sorted and entered. Not every building has been completely documented.

All images in the Index are either born-digital photographs of windows or buildings or are scans of slides, prints, or other published sources. These images have been provided by volunteers and the quality of the material varies widely.

If you have any questions, additions or corrections, or think you can provide better images and are willing to share them, please contact donald20@msu.edu