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Featured Window

Window of the Month
Artist: David Wilson - St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, Hartland, Michigan

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Window

Building Name: Alumni Memorial Chapel

Studio Name: Willet Stained Glass Studio

City: East Lansing

Window Shape: 2 (rectangle)

Date of Window: 1959

Subject/Title of Window: Charity

Brief Description of Subject: One in a set of three windows located on the east side of chancel. The emblem in the middle of the window is the combination of the symbols of giving and healing. In the upper left corner is a scene of feeding refugee children of barbed wire fences and a guard tower. In the bottom right corner is a missionary nurse tending a sick man symbolizing caring for others in remote places. The ship represents transportation of foods and medicines where they are needed. Most windows in the Alumni Memorial Chapel are sets of three on the same general topic with the same donor. This window is grouped with Prayer (L1a) and Self Denial (L1b). This image is slightly cropped on the right. The caduceus is an emblem of the staff of Moses which He turned into a snake during His defenses of the Hebrew people as well as a figure He erected during a time of the afflictions of His people in the desert. The central figure of the caduceus addresses the idea of charity and compassion in the care of the afflicted as much as the idea of the moral force of Mosaic law in the ordering and perhaps the compassion of society. Designed by Anthony Mako.

Inscriptions: Charity
Care


Height: 42"

Width: 18"

Type of Glass and Technique: Antique or Cathedral Glass, Lead Came, Vitreous Paint

Charity
Charity

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