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Featured Window

Window of the Month
Detroit Institute of Arts

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Window

Building Name: St. Mary Magdalen Catholic Church

Artist Name: Maria Orr

City: Kentwood

Window Shape: 2 (rectangle)

Subject/Title of Window: King David

Brief Description of Subject: One of nine exits from the Shrine of the Penitent, adulterer and murderer. all doors lead to God’s altar of forgiveness, the ultimate symbol of mercy and rebirth. King David, the second king of Israel, was a warrior, musician and poet. After sending Uriah, one of his military commanders, to certain death in battle in order to hide his adulterous relationship with Uriah’s wife, David repented of his sins and was forgiven (II Samuel 11 and 12). A penitent King David reflects on his sinful acts. The forgiven King David playing his lyre. David, the second king of Israel, was highly regarded as a warrior, musician, and poet. He is traditionally credited with composing many of the psalms in the Book of Psalms. David’s life was not perfect. He betrayed one of his military commanders, Uriah, sending him to certain death in battle in order to cover up his adulterous relationship with Uriah’s wife, Bathsheba. A prophet named Nathan confronted David with his sin. He repented and God restored him. These windows were designed and painted by Michigan artist and longtime church member Maria Orr and were fabricated at the Pristine Glass Company in Grand Rapids, where she was employed. Pristine Glass employees Elizabeth Kolenda and her staff were much involved in the fabrication process by creating and cutting all the digital layouts for the window designs.

Inscriptions: King David


King David
King David
A pentinent King David
A pentinent King David
A forgiven King David
A forgiven King David

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