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Window of the Month
Artist: David Wilson - St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, Hartland, Michigan

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Window

Building Name: Adrian College Chapel

City: Adrian

Window Shape: 2 (rectangle)

Date of Window: 1964

Subject/Title of Window: Council of Nicea

Brief Description of Subject: First great council of the Church (325 A.D.) where its course for the future was indicated The eight north windows represent the development of Christian beliefs and the Christian church prior to the Reformation Main leader of Council of Nicea, Athanasium of Alexandria, pictured with back to viewer, brooding over course of Council. On right are symbols of Apostolic creed which gained importance as result of the Council. Shown is the first great council of the Church where its course for the future was first indicated. Perhaps the greatest influence in the Council was Athanasius of Alexandria, pictured with his back to the viewer, brooding over the course of the council. On the right are symbols of the Apostolic creed which gained in importance as a result of the council. John Wesley’s “hour of decision” on evening of May 24, 1738 while attending a Moravian service in Aldersgate Street. Three figuires in upper portion: Jacobus Arminius, who influenced Wesley theologically, Charles Wesley writing music, and George Whitefield, preaching. Lower left: globe of world and Wesley’s clock pointing to a quarter to nine. The Council of Nicea, 325 A.D., includes Athanasius of Alexandria and symbols of the Apostle’s Creed.

Height: 13’1.5”

Width: 5’

Council of Nicea
Council of Nicea

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