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Detroit Institute of Arts

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Window

Building Name: Adrian College Chapel

City: Adrian

Window Shape: 2 (rectangle)

Date of Window: 1964

Subject/Title of Window: Methodism in America

Brief Description of Subject: The eight south windows represent the development of Protestantism, with emphasis on the Methodist Church and Methodist higher education at Adrian College Main figure: Francis Asbury (1745-1816 A.D.) standing in pulpit with Bible in right hand. Building is Captain Thomas Webb’s sail loft in New York City at 120 William Street, rented by Methodists in 1767 for their services. Medallion: Thomas Coke and burning candle, symbol of knowledge. Coke influenced founding of Cokesbury College (1787) by American Methodists, their first venture into higher education. Circuit rider is Peter Cartwright, symbolizing the men who spread Methodist movement across American continent. The main figure is Francis Asbury (1745-1816 A.D.) standing in the pulpit with a Bible in his right hand. The building is Captain Thomas Webb’s sail loft in New York City at 120 William Street. This loft was rented by the Methodists in 1767 for their services. The medallion shows Thomas Coke and the burning candle, symbol of knowledge. It was largely as a result of his influence that Cokesbury College (1787) was founded by the American Methodists. It was thier first venture into higher education. The figure of the circuit rider is the legendary Peter Cartwright, Symbolizing that dedicated and able company of men who spread the Methodist movement on this continent from ocean to ocean.

Height: 13’1.5”

Width: 5’

Methodism in America
Methodism in America

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