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Window of the Month
Artist: David Wilson - St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, Hartland, Michigan

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Window

Building Name: Adrian College Chapel

City: Adrian

Window Shape: 2 (rectangle)

Date of Window: 1964

Subject/Title of Window: The Trinity

Brief Description of Subject: The eight north windows represent the development of Christian beliefs and the Christian church prior to the Reformation. Symbols of the Trinity: The Father, triangle and Hebrew letter symbolizing God; The Son, the Lamb; The Holy Spirit, the Dove. Pictured are three Cappadocian Fathers (Basil the Great, Gregory of Nyssa, and Gregory of Nanzianzen), leaders of Eastern Church and proponents of Doctrine of the Trinity. Also pictured is Tertullian, Church Father of third century in North Africa, promoter of doctrine of Trinity. Seated figure is St. Paul, writing his Epistles to seven churches, depicted, preparing theological stage for doctrine of Trinity. The symbols of the Trinity consist of : The Father-the triangle and Hebrew letter symbolizing God; The Son-The Lamb; The Holy Spirit-the dove. Pictured are the three Cappadocian Fathers (Basil the Great, Gregory of Nyssa, and Gregory of Nanzianzen), leaders of the Eastern Church and proponents of the Doctrine of the Trinity. The forth figure, at left, is Tetullian, a church Father of the third century in North Africa, and likewise influential in promoting the doctrine of the Trinity. The seated figure is St. Paul, writing his Epistles to the seven Churches, herein depicted, and setting the theological stage for the doctrine of the Trinity. The sword and Open Book represent the well known symbol “Spiritus Gladius”

Height: 13’4”

Width: 5’

The Trinity
The Trinity

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