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Featured Window

Window of the Month
Artist: David Wilson - St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, Hartland, Michigan

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Window

Building Name: Episcopal Church of the Mediator

Studio Name: Hector and Smith Glass

City: Harbert

Window Shape: 2 (rectangle)

Date of Window: 2014

Subject/Title of Window: The Old Covenant

Brief Description of Subject: Eye of God, Tau shaped Hebrew altar with lamb, tent, stars, Ten Commandments. God (the eye) looks down from above. His law is absolute. A covenant has been made between God and man and it calls for man’s complete faith and obedience. Abraham’s loving trust was rewarded as the ram was sacrificed instead of his beloved Isaac. In the window we see the Tau shaped Hebrew altar holding the lamb with the sacrificial knife above. There is a tent shape marked by a rainbow of stars, twelve representing the tribes of Israel beneath the star of David. The rich vibrant colors reflect the rainbow of the first covenant between God and Noah, and in the straight, strong lines we feel the purpose and prophetic destiny of Abraham’s children under God. In the top of this center window we see the cloud, the moving pillar that is God’s Spirit that the people followed to find their way out of the desert. In the second panel of the window we see the coming of Moses and the Commandments, and there is a new ‘feel’. The wind of the Spirit is moving across the land and a new hope is with the children of God. The bush burns but is not consumed; the serpent is contained upon the rod; and water and manna sustain the people on their difficult journey. God’s plan is being fulfilled, and the New Testament covenant is yet to come.

Condition of Window: Good

Height: 41"

Width: 55"

Type of Glass and Technique: Slab or Faceted Glass (Dalle de Verre)

Old Covenant
Old Covenant

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