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Featured Window

Window of the Month
Our Lady of Grace, Dearborn Heights, Michigan

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Window

Building Name: St. James Episcopal Church

Studio Name: Lamb (J. and R.) Co.

City: Birmingham

Window Shape: 2 (rectangle)

Subject/Title of Window: St. Agnes

Brief Description of Subject: The beautiful story of the life of St. Agnes is most affectively brought forth by the simple figure of the young girl who lived to be only twelve years of age, according to tradition.

The strength of her faith and purity led her to continue to look upward toward God in the face of the most intense persuasion and persecution. The dove in the upper corner us bearing the golden wedding ring, which forms part of the story of her life, since she persisted against the most intense attacks against her virginity.
The two columns form of blossoming lilies represent the protected walls of Purity, while the flames rising up beyond these columns, at the outer edge of the window, are the symbol of the attacking passions on the part of the many who wanted to claim her.

For her purity she earned the name of St. Agnes meaning the lamb, and the symbol of the pure white lamb is therefore shown resting at her feet. The words of the Bestitude “Blessed are the Pure in Heart for They Shall See God” are particularly applicable to her since it was her power to look up to God that kept her snice it was her power to look up to God that kept her safe and blessed.

The symbol of the lamb standing upon the book of the Word of God and looking upward is also placed above the words of the Bestitude as symbols of their meaning. In every way, this window expresses the courage of the Spirit combined with the Purity of Soul of this fine child of God.  


Height: 57"

Width: 37"

Type of Glass and Technique: Antique or Cathedral Glass

St. Agnes
St. Agnes

The MSGC is a constantly evolving database. Not all the data that has been collected by volunteers has been sorted and entered. Not every building has been completely documented.

All images in the Index are either born-digital photographs of windows or buildings or are scans of slides, prints, or other published sources. These images have been provided by volunteers and the quality of the material varies widely.

If you have any questions, additions or corrections, or think you can provide better images and are willing to share them, please contact donald20@msu.edu